Special Session Proposals


Special Session Proposal 1:

Quality Specifications and Performance-based Management of Highway Bridges

Objectives:
Quality control frameworks are being implemented worldwide by bridge owners. This allows to develop a performance-based oriented management of their bridge stocks by the definition of a set of performance goals at component, system and network level and the proposal of the corresponding performance indicators. COST Action TU1406 aims to bring together research and practicing communities in order to establish an European guideline. The session will cover not only the main results from such Action related to European initiative to the establishment of good practices and the use of quality control procedures for the life-cycle management of bridges, but also contributions from people working worldwide on this topic.

Organisers:
Joan R. Casas
UPC-Barcelona Tech, Spain
  José Campos e Matos
University of Minho, Portugal 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Special Session Proposal 2:

Strengthening of Concrete and Metallic Bridges with FRP and SMA Materials

Objectives:
There are a large number of concrete and metallic bridges, which are aging because of fatigue and corrosion damages. The increasing service loads and harsh environmental conditions make these structures even more vulnerable. There is clearly a need for studies that aim to develop feasible retrofitting methods, along with simple and safe design, for the strengthening of bridge structures. This special session will share new research results on static and fatigue strengthening of concrete and metallic bridges using fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) as well as shape memory alloys (SMA) and will provide a platform for researchers to discuss and compare their research results and to enhance future collaboration in this topic.

Organisers:
Elyas Ghafoori
Empa, Switzerland
  José Sena Cruz
University of Minho, Portugal 
 
   


Special Session Proposal 3:

FE Model Updating as an Available Tool for Structural Assessment

Objectives:
Finite element model updating based on the modal domain is gaining importance in the field of non-destructive identification techniques. One of its main advantages is that it can be carried out considering in-service conditions. This method improves the accuracy of the FE models of structures based on their natural frequencies and vibration modes obtained experimentally via dynamic field tests. The updated model allows reducing the uncertainties associated with the estimation of several physical parameters of the structure. This session focuses in the different possibilities that this tool offers to assess the structural behaviour of structures (civil and building engineering).

Organisers:
Javier Fernando Jiménez Alonso
Universidad de Sevilla, Spain
  Pablo Pachón Garcia
Universidad de Sevilla, Spain 
 
     


Special Session Proposal 4:

SHM informed decision making for a resilient built environment

Objectives:
Extreme events and acts of terrorism have highlighted the need for resilient communities, cities, and infrastructures that provide strategic functionalities for the society. Structural health monitoring systems may support the developement of a resilient built environment by: (i) reducing risk through informed decision making, based on the integration of monitored aging conditions of the structures within the risk model; and (ii) improving recovery by prioritizing interventions, based on information available in the emergency phases following natural or man-made disasters. The aim of this Special Session is to bring together experts in SHM systems and risk management to share knowledge and foster future collaborations. The session will host contributions that cover, but are not limited to, SHM algorithms for identification and damage identification, real time monitoring systems and projects, SHM systems for multi-hazard environments, SHM supported emergency management, integration of SHM in procedures for risk assessment, Value of Information of SHM.

Organisers:
Maria Pina Limongelli
Politecnico di Milano (PoliMI), Italy
  Dagang Lu
Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT), China
 
   
       
Michael Havbro Faber
Aalborg University (AAU), Denmark
  Paolo Gardoni
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
 
   


Special Session Proposal 5:

Multi-hazard risk assessment and urban resilience

Objectives:
Over the past years there has been an increasing concern among the international community about the effects of natural and manmade hazards in urban areas whose impacts are becoming more frequent, more severe and more widespread. In order to tackle this global issue, it is fundamental to engage and develop fundamental and applied research that can lead to more efficient urban practices and policy making based on a thorough understanding of all the components that constitute urban systems and that contribute to their resilience. In light of the exposed, this session aims at stimulating the exchange of knowledge and new perspectives on the assessment and mitigation of multi-hazard risks in a changing climate. Particularly welcome are contributions dealing with the development, validation and practical implementation of innovative techniques, methods and tools for assessing, managing and mitigating risk at different scales.

Organisers:
Tiago Miguel dos Santos Ferreira
University of Minho, Portugal
  Romeu da Silva Vicente
University of Aveiro, Portugal 
 
   
       
Gian Paolo Cimellaro
Politecnico di Torino, Italy
     
     


Special Session Proposal 6:

FRP reinforcement for more durable and resilient infrastructure

Objectives:
One of the key driving forces behind the development of innovative reinforcing solutions for concrete structures is the need for more durable infrastructure. The inherent corrosion resistance of Fibre Reinforced Polymers (FRP), along with their high strength to weight ratio, has driven the use of FRP in a wide range of civil engineering applications. Engineers and asset owners are excited by the prospect of more durable structures, and researchers and code committees are continuously working towards the development of more refined design models to exploit fully the physical and mechanical properties of FRP. This special session will progress the state-of-the-art and provide timely insights into the short and long term behaviour of FRP reinforced concrete structures. Topics include: cracking; deflections; bond; fatigue; durability; test methods and design models.

Organisers:
Maurizio Guadagnini
University of Sheffield, UK
  Cristina Barris
University of Girona, Spain
 
   


Special Session Proposal 7:

Asset management in rail and road mobility infrastructures

Objectives:
Asset Management is not intended to direct management of assets. Anyway, it is a core competence of infrastructure maintenance and renewal with reference to the decision-making and planning processes, with the corresponding effects and connections between different dimensions in infrastructure companies – e.g. strategic planning, finance and control, purchasing and logistics, etc. In a way, it is fair to say that Asset Management has not been implemented, having before evolved organically in the organizations preceding the modern infrastructure managers and creating the conditions for its establishment. During several years of experience in railway and road infrastructure management and operations, IP and BRISA have developed a set of asset management tools aligned with international best practices in the sector. Asset Management develops around three pillars – Cost, Risk and Performance, well grounded in asset knowledge through the development inspection, diagnosis and planning activities.

Organisers:
Rui Coutinho
Infraestruturas de Portugal, SA, Portugal
  Carlos Biscaia Oliveira
Brisa, SA, Portugal 
 
   


Special Session Proposal 8:

Bridge management and resilience under dynamic and seismic actions

Objectives:
The resilience-based design and assessment of bridges subjected to dynamic and most importantly earthquake excitations plays an important role in bridge management decisions. The main scope of this special session is to present advanced and emerging knowledge in this subject area, considered most relevant to the assessment and rehabilitation of existing bridges. This session aims to bring together designers, academics, researchers, and engineering students working on resilience of bridges; and how this is incorporated in our seismic and dynamic modelling and design; bridge lifecycle cost analysis and in the decision making process for highway and railway structures assessment.

Organisers:
Pedro da Silva Delgado
Inst. Politécnico de Viana
do Castelo, Portugal
  Joana Maia de Oliveira Almeida
Instituto Politécnico de Viana
do Castelo, Portugal
 
 
   

     
Stergios A Mitoulis
University of Surrey, UK
     
     


Special Session Proposal 9:

Application of risk, reliability and treatment of uncertainties in structural engineering

Objectives:
The role of structural engineering for the sustainable development of our society is of central importance. Engineering structures provide the functionality of the built environment and the safety of its users, and, consequently, a large proportion of the societal economic resources are invested into the continued development, maintenance and renewal of structures. For society it is of crucial importance that decisions related to structures are optimal in the sense that the benefit of structures as well as the possible adverse consequences such as loss of lives, damage to the qualities of the environment and the direct and committed costs are considered. Advanced methods for risk and reliability analysis have continuously evolved in the last decades and now offer the foundation for rational decision making. While the application of these methods is well established in some subdomains of structural engineering, like marine engineering, they are rarely used in general. In the present session, examples on the application of advanced risk and reliability based analysis will be presented. The examples are taken from real engineering projects and demonstrate the benefits of advanced analysis.

Organisers:
Jochen Köhler
Norwegian University of Science
and Technology, Norway
     
     


Special Session Proposal 10:

Novel issues on bridges and structures management

Objectives:
The main objective of this session is to discuss, among a set of worldwide experts, the current and propose novel frameworks for an economically efficient, environmentally friendly and socially reconcilable management of existing bridges and structures. It will focus the following topics: (1) data collection; (2) database modelling (including the Building Information Management (BIM)); (3) performance assessment; (4) performance prediction models (incorporating the topic of risk, resilience, extreme events and climate change); and (5) decision-making models and tools.

Organisers: 
Rade Hajdin
IMC Consulting, Switzerland
  José Campos e Matos
University of Minho, Portugal 
 
   


Special Session Proposal 11:

Adaptable Structures - what really is serviceability?

Objectives:
This session will disseminate and discuss the findings of the IABSE British Group Henderson Colloquium 2018. Design for serviceability governs many structural schemes through the codified use of general rules (span to depth ratios, deflection ratios, frequency limits) that create a general rather than a specific solution. These rules provide a baseline, but often don’t fully account for the realities of user comfort and perception. Can increased monitoring of existing and new structures provide the data that allows for alterations to these rules? Can modern data analysis techniques allow us to update load factors on a regular or live basis based on current information?
How good are we really at predicting the future use of our structures?
How well do we understand what governs serviceability, and should this be driving design?
What prospective new technologies are there that may improve serviceability performance?

Organisers:
David Knight
Cake Industries, UK
  Ian Firth
COWI UK, UK 
 
   


Special Session Proposal 12:

Technical codes on SHM and NDT: bridging the gap between research and applications

Objectives:
Structural health monitoring (SHM) and non-destructive testing (NDT) are strategic tools for the non invasive assessment of the structural health state. Whilst research on these topics has seen important developments in the last 30years, their large scale application proceeds with a slower pace. The development of standards and guidelines can provide an effective support to designers and managers and foster the practical implementation of these technologies to real world cases.

The fib Action Group 9 is currently collecting background documents to support the formulation of a section of the MC2020 dedicated to SHM and Testing. The aim of this Special Session is to support the work of AG9 by bringing together researchers and professionals and foster discussions and further collaborations. Potential topics of the Session include, but are not limited to: sensors, structural and damage identification, SHM supported life-cycle performance assessment, design by testing, NDT testing, SHM supported decision making, uncertainties quantification, performance indicators, case studies.

Organisers:
Maria Pina Limongelli
Politecnico di Milano (PoliMI),
Italy
  Alfred Strauss
Institut für konstruktiven Ingenieurbau,
Austria
 
 
   
       
Sylvia Keßler
Technical University of Munich,
Germany
  Helmut Wenzel
WENZEL Consulting Engineers GmbH,
Austria
 
   


Special Session Proposal 13:

Improved resilience of built environment to earthquake-induced liquefaction disasters

Objectives:
Recent events have demonstrated that earthquake-induced liquefaction events cause structural damages, which increase the total amount of losses due to the ground shaking. A resilient built environment reduces these negative effects on the community at whole. How to effectively assess and improve resilience of built environment to earthquake events, and more in particular to earthquake-induced liquefaction events, is still a knowledge gap, which recently the scientific community is looking at. In this context, this special session aims at bringing together contributions on recently developed methodologies to assess 1) soil liquefaction hazard, 2) vulnerability, risk and resilience of the built asset to this hazard, 3) efficiency of mitigation strategies and 4) strategic built asset management planning reducing soil liquefaction impact on structures. The special session is open to articles presenting findings of the European H2020 project LiquefACT (GA no. 700748) and any contribution from scholars working on these topics.

Organisers:
Keith Jones
Anglia Ruskin University, UK
  Mariantonietta Morga
Anglia Ruskin University, UK 
 
   
       
Carlo Giovanni Lai
University of Pavia, Italy
  Claudia Meisina
University of Pavia, Italy
 
 

 


Special Session Proposal 14:

Masonry arch bridges: the challenge to increase the loads and to extend their life-time

Objectives:
Masonry bridges are the backbone of the European railway network and still an important part of the road system. Therefore, not only maintenance is needed but also strengthening and retrofitting aiming at increasing the loads and improving the seismic performance. To this aim, a detailed knowledge of the bridge mechanics and of the testing and retrofitting techniques is needed to avoid economic losses originated by inadequate works. The aim of this special session is to spread among the Structural Engineers the most up-to-date results of the scientific research in this field with the main focus on structural analysis procedures, either detailed and simplified, and on new retrofitting techniques deduced from the scientific research. Among these themes: new testing and analysis methods, assessment criteria, risk analysis, retrofitting strategies, monitoring techniques. Last not least, the cultural value of masonry bridges should never be forgotten when designing retrofitting works.

Organisers:
Antonio Brencich
University of Genova, Italy
  Zoltan Orban
University of Pecs, Hungary 
 
   


Special Session Proposal 15:

Why invest in SHM of Civil Engineering infrastructures?

Objectives:
Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) has been a subject of major international research in Civil Engineering structures mainly during the last 20 years. While in the beginning, SHM mainly focused on sensor developments, nowadays practical implications regarding the acquisition, collecting and processing of data are being addressed. Indeed, SHM systems have been evolving along the two last decades and have been steadily implemented as a complement to visual inspections. Nevertheless, the decision to invest on a SHM system should be set on evidence that a payback is given to the owners/authorities and/or to society in terms of reduced maintenance costs and/or increased structural safety. Indeed, the understanding of the value of SHM, particularly before its implementation, remains an open issue. A novel utilization of applied decision analysis on how to assess the value of SHM is being addressed in the COST Action TU1402 – Quantifying the Value of SHM. This approach allows to improve decision basis for design, operation and life-cycle integrity management of structures and facilitates more cost efficient, reliable and safe strategies for maintaining and developing the built environment to the benefit of society. In this context, this special session aims to show evidence, mainly from an owner/authority perspective, of the benefit of applying SHM systems in Civil Engineering structures supported by the Value of SHM Information theory. Hence, authors willing to submit a piece of work to this session need to keep in mind the targeted audience - owners/authorities – when structuring and writing the manuscript. Applications of SHM systems on full scale structures are welcome, with a meaningful message, i.e. if there is a benefit or not in using this type of systems supported by the Value of SHM Information theory. Formal joint collaborations between both academia and industry, either in the manuscript and/or the oral presentation is a plus.

Organisers:
Helder Sousa
HSC / BRISA, Portugal
  Jochen Köhler
Norwegian University of Science & Technology,
NTNU, Norway
 

 
 

     
Maria Giuseppina Limongelli
Politecnico di Milano (PoliMI), Italy   
  Sebastian Thöns
Technical University of Denmark, Denmark
 

 
 
       
Ana Mandic
University of Zagreb, Croatia
  Wim Courage
TNO – Innovation for life, Netherlands
 

 
 
       


Special Session Proposal 16:

Building Information Modelling in Structural Engineering: Methods and case studies

Objectives:
Building Information Modelling (BIM) is a methodology for sharing information and for communication between all stakeholders and during all the phases of the lifecycle of a construction. BIM is supported by a digital model, accessible by software, which allows the virtual manipulation of the construction. Operating as a Structural Engineer is enduring important evolutions due to BIM and digital processes in general, which are allowing the entire construction chain to become more productive and effective since design stages, through construction and even into later stages such as operation management and demolition/recycling. Even though BIM adoption is significantly increasing worldwide, it is still not a widespread practice in many contexts (e.g. in infrastructure) and many new challenges arise as application is attempted in different contexts, particularly in connection with emerging related technologies (e.g. advanced surveying, digital fabrication, cloud computing/collaboration, IoT, augmented/virtual reality). In such context, this session intends to promote discussion and share knowledge in recent BIM developments and applications.

Organisers:
Miguel Azenha
University of Minho, Portugal
  Tomo Cerovšek
University of Ljubljana, Slovenia
 

 
 

     
José Carlos Lino
University of Minho, BIMMS, Portugal